Seasonal employment is commonly associated with retail, but we know that many industries – from agriculture to manufacturing – all depend on seasonal/temporary staff to help during predictable busy seasons.  

Temporary work is a staple of the American economy, and it comes with both advantages and disadvantages for workers, no matter the industry.   

Let’s explore some of the things that make seasonal work unique so you can figure out whether a seasonal job is right for you.  

What Are the Pros of Seasonal Work?  

Seasonal work comes with a firm start and end date. While that can be daunting, it’s important to remember that temp jobs still come with new opportunities.  

Some of the positive reasons you might take a seasonal job include:  

  • Chance to try a new position  
  • Opportunity for career migration  
  • Gain experience for another job  
  • Prevent gaps in your employment history  

These – combined with a paycheck and benefits – are great reasons to pick up a seasonal job, even if what you really want is a permanent role.  

When Should You Turn Down the Job?  

Seasonal work is short-term by definition. If you have your mindset on a permanent job and don’t feel you can commit to something that lasts only a month or two, then you’re better off leaving the job offer behind. Employers can spot uncommitted workers a mile away, and if long-term work is your goal, then the mindset can set you back among employers who might look to keep the best seasonal staff around longer.  

You might also find it difficult to take a seasonal job if it’s in a new field or role, and you don’t enjoy learning on your feet. If you get hired to help meet higher targets, your site manager and teammates may not have the time or energy to go through the fundamentals with you. You may find some of the day-to-day parts of the job more frustrating than the paycheck is worth.  

Taking a Seasonal Job Doesn’t Mean You have to Live Like a Temp  

No one can deny that there are both pros and cons of taking temporary or seasonal work. It can be a great stepping stone into a good gig, but it also comes with an element of risk. Seasonal employment is a balancing act, and it takes a particular type of worker to not only get the job done but also thrive in the role.  

At Energi Personnel, we help our seasonal staff by giving you some of the same perks you get as a full-time worker. You’ll enjoy paid holidays (New Years, Good Friday, Memorial Day, July 4th, Labor Day, Thanksgiving, Christmas Day) and even get a referral bonus for every staff member you refer who works at least 40 hours with us.  Give us a call today and join the Energi Personnel team.